Classroom interventions need to balance content and process to become effective

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process

The tensions between process and content in teaching-learning activities are going to exist as long as educators are divided into process and content camps. However, many well meaning educators want the process and content to go hand in hand to achieve a balance between the two. An activity, action, technique or process for its own sake does not result into learning, many feel. Thus, a process may be necessary, but never sufficient for learning to happen.

For teachers, what they teach or Content and how they teach or Process (pedagogy), both are equally important. The teacher-managed Process or technique always needs to by balanced successful transmission of the content. Thus, we can say that transmission of content is necessary, but not sufficient, for learning to take place.

Thus, a suitable fit needs to be established between Content and Process by trying out interventions based on the context of the learners and their needs.  For classroom interventions, there is nothing like ‘pure technique’ or ‘pure process’ since the technique or process cannot happen in vacuum. However, there can be centrality of technique or process since it requires both content area and skill to implement it.  The ultimate aim of any classroom intervention is the enhancement of learning of content by students; therefore, technique has to be in consonance in the nature of the content and context of students.

Use of media too requires appropriate technique for its use and skill requires both group practice and individual practice for its honing. All depends on the focus or centrality but other factors cannot be ignored, they have less emphasis. Teaching when treated as science cannot work as pure science.

The comment, “we could put in some media or use other strategies that help the teaching learning process run well in order to improve students’ skill but we can use the media as long as it does not interfere with the application of the technique”, seems to be more logical.

Any classroom intervention has a combination of what to teach, how to teach (processes, methods, techniques, procedure, design or plan) and with what materials (resources, media, tools or aids) to teach. At times, teacher-researchers do pedagogical experiments to find out under given conditions and inputs what happens or what works the best.

The current classroom research, when done by the teacher as a practitioner, has its own limitation due to lack of valid and reliable data collection tools. According to education.stateuniversity.com, some of the new directions for classroom observation research include the following: (1) combining both qualitative and quantitative methods in observation systems; (2) developing observation instruments that are based on “standards” of pedagogy; (3) using student-centered observation instruments that allow for comparisons between groups of students within the class; and (4) using instruments that assess authentic, interactive instructional practices that have been found to relate to student gains on higher-level cognitive outcomes.

Any classroom intervention has a combination of what to teach, how to teach (processes, methods, techniques, procedure, design or plan) and with what materials (resources, media, tools or aids) to teach and classroom research has to look into its efficacy.

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